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Alexandra Zuzene

Alexandra Zuzene

7th/8th Grade English Teacher at MVMS
  • “I often fantasize of a world in which male friends casually chat about bell hooks or Audre Lorde, as my female friends and I do.”

    I belong to an open book club that just happens to have morphed into a very feminist one. Only two men have stuck around, the rest who have popped in have never returned

    “I often fantasize of a world in which male friends casually chat about bell hooks or Audre Lorde, as my female friends and I do.”

    I belong to an open book club that just happens to have morphed into a very feminist one. Only two men have stuck around, the rest who have popped in have never returned, despite our best efforts to be friendly (we have an open door policy on purpose). Yet we’ve never had an issue retaining new female members. This is why it bothers me that feminist stuff is targeted at women—it’s the men who need to learn how to not oppress and abuse, not the women who need to learn how to “overcome” it!

  • Adults also seem to forget the joy of re-reading. There is also joy in experiencing the same story through a new medium like an audiobook, play, or movie. This is why it’s important to not be snobs about the things we love! Just enjoy, damn it, whatever that means for YOU in that moment.

  • “...the American idea of “meritocracy” both perpetuates and relies on traditional gender roles.

    So long as women are expected to serve as the primary caregivers for children, and so long as the gender pay gap persists, women in high-income brackets will continue to be more likely to give up their jobs

    “...the American idea of “meritocracy” both perpetuates and relies on traditional gender roles.

    So long as women are expected to serve as the primary caregivers for children, and so long as the gender pay gap persists, women in high-income brackets will continue to be more likely to give up their jobs and stay home. In so doing, the women become targets for cultural disdain—as does the time they spend renovating, shopping, and doing other tasks that are necessary to maintain their families’ lifestyles.”

  • As someone with a Linguistics degree and an English educator, I’d have to agree. “Rules” like these are not based on actual usage, which evolves over time in a living language. Enforcement of unnecessary prescriptions is pedantic and futile in the long-term.

    That being said, decoding writing is a slightly

    As someone with a Linguistics degree and an English educator, I’d have to agree. “Rules” like these are not based on actual usage, which evolves over time in a living language. Enforcement of unnecessary prescriptions is pedantic and futile in the long-term.

    That being said, decoding writing is a slightly different ballgame. See a recent court order for a company to shell out millions to its employees because it didn’t use an Oxford comma to make their meaning clear on overtime pay exemptions!

    Bottom line: clarity of meaning. That’s what language is for!

  • Fascinating (and terrifying) read. Super not surprised though.

    “Scientific research strongly suggests that testing helps students learn. Yet, for this to be the case, it is important to give the right kind of tests. Those adopted by the states in response to NCLB were largely fill-in-the-blank, one-right-answer

    Fascinating (and terrifying) read. Super not surprised though.

    “Scientific research strongly suggests that testing helps students learn. Yet, for this to be the case, it is important to give the right kind of tests. Those adopted by the states in response to NCLB were largely fill-in-the-blank, one-right-answer tests that never asked students to defend a position or to find different pathways to come to a defensible conclusion. In fact, many contend that NCLB, and to some extent the testing craze that has continued under the implementation of the Common Core, is the antithesis of the active learning approach that has been endorsed repeatedly by those who study the science of learning.”

  • Pretty sure we already knew this. (Of course it’s always good to verify with new or reproduced studies.)

    As purely anecdotal evidence, I can definitely see a correlation between parental literacy and child literacy among my students. Kids talk about their parents reading new books and about being taken

    Pretty sure we already knew this. (Of course it’s always good to verify with new or reproduced studies.)

    As purely anecdotal evidence, I can definitely see a correlation between parental literacy and child literacy among my students. Kids talk about their parents reading new books and about being taken to the library or bookstore. Those kids are voracious readers and tend to have higher emotional and social capabilities in addition to reading and writing skills. Even seeing books around the house make it seem like a normal life thing rather than a forced school-only thing and that mental block (or lack there of) is huge!

  • I’m shocked the teachers didn’t know this... but it’s not really their fault—that is a serious deficiency in Pennsylvania’s elementary licensure program, and the state’s Ed department should rectify that.

  • For men who may have a knee-jerk reaction to this headline and want “men only spaces” too: All public spaces are male spaces because that is the power dominant group in this society. Just like all public spaces are white spaces. As long as inequalities exist, minority and oppressed groups will need their

    For men who may have a knee-jerk reaction to this headline and want “men only spaces” too: All public spaces are male spaces because that is the power dominant group in this society. Just like all public spaces are white spaces. As long as inequalities exist, minority and oppressed groups will need their own spaces. That’s pretty natural, if you think about it. Were you bullied in school for being into robotics or something? You had a special club for that, where you could be you with like-minded peers and nobody forced you to invite theater kids or football players.

  • For some reason, I always imagined parents showing kids and being obvious with them about pictures posted. That’s what I’d do, but I guess that’s naive. Parents are the ones who need the digital literacy classes—or maybe a digital ethics class might hit the spot better. Children are people, too, and

    For some reason, I always imagined parents showing kids and being obvious with them about pictures posted. That’s what I’d do, but I guess that’s naive. Parents are the ones who need the digital literacy classes—or maybe a digital ethics class might hit the spot better. Children are people, too, and they should have rights to privacy and consent when it comes to online info.

    That being said... it always freaked me out when my tias knew every detail about my life until I realized parents are huge blabbermouths, no matter what technology they have at their disposal.