Skip to navigationSkip to content
Jordan Husney

Jordan Husney

CEO at Parabol.co (free online retrospectives & culture monitoring)

Maker of app for high-performing teams. Former Strategy Director at Undercurrent. Currently residing in Los Angeles.

44 Following51 Followers
  • Some nuance to add: my company, Parabol, just completed Techstars. Later this year we will raise our seed. Here's what we learned: similar to the article, focus first on building conditional commitments to join the round (they may sound like, "when you have a lead and if we can get 20% ownership percentage, we'd be in for $300k.") Oversubscribe on conditional commitments. Then, return and negotiate terms—let the desire for ownership dictate who will be the lead. The reason for this ordering is a

    Some nuance to add: my company, Parabol, just completed Techstars. Later this year we will raise our seed. Here's what we learned: similar to the article, focus first on building conditional commitments to join the round (they may sound like, "when you have a lead and if we can get 20% ownership percentage, we'd be in for $300k.") Oversubscribe on conditional commitments. Then, return and negotiate terms—let the desire for ownership dictate who will be the lead. The reason for this ordering is a recognition that early in the process the power balance is completely with investors (unless you are an entrepreneur with a track record). By collecting commitments first, you even out and possibly flip the power balance—creating conditions to perhaps even choose from among multiple term sheets from potential leads. Want to see if we can pull it off? Follow me...

  • I am tired of businesses that don't organize around the customer. Here is another way to do things

  • Take aways for me:

    - nothing wards off failure like making your own money

    - blitzscaling still applies when you need to break old models

    - sustainable business practices—lifting the fortunes of your partners rather than being extractive—creates more value for everybody in the long run

  • Many true innovations look ridiculous at first—these vehicles look like a case study from Christiansen's Innovator's Dilemma. Remember: hydraulics, micro hard drives, and 8-bit microprocessors all seemed ridiculous until they grew up into hydraulic backhoes, the iPod, and the PC. Perhaps we shouldn't be thinking of these as competing with cars but as a platform for what else they could become?

  • This article is crap. HBS isn't the cause of moral bankruptcy: it's the belief in the equivalency between wealth and righteousness. HBS is a side show. From the VF article itself one need look no further than this quote: “a prominent female C.E.O. of a New York-based firm...explained, ‘There’s also a kind of entrepreneurial delusion that seems unavoidable when you get that big, that fast. They were too focused on making every sale, making Wall Street happy, raising the stock price, and making themselves

    This article is crap. HBS isn't the cause of moral bankruptcy: it's the belief in the equivalency between wealth and righteousness. HBS is a side show. From the VF article itself one need look no further than this quote: “a prominent female C.E.O. of a New York-based firm...explained, ‘There’s also a kind of entrepreneurial delusion that seems unavoidable when you get that big, that fast. They were too focused on making every sale, making Wall Street happy, raising the stock price, and making themselves rich and self-satisfied. When you get that wealthy, you start to buy your own bullshit.’”

  • As the historian in the article illustrates, Bush's adoption of rightward Texan social values marked the decided end of any return to Rockefeller Rupublicanism and noblesse obligé. He contributed to polarizing the country socially, and moved us all a bit further to the right (along with Clinton's abandonment of McGovern's Democratic principles) setting the conditions for our current political era: an age of emphasizing difference rather seeking common ground. Was he the first to do this? Heck no

    As the historian in the article illustrates, Bush's adoption of rightward Texan social values marked the decided end of any return to Rockefeller Rupublicanism and noblesse obligé. He contributed to polarizing the country socially, and moved us all a bit further to the right (along with Clinton's abandonment of McGovern's Democratic principles) setting the conditions for our current political era: an age of emphasizing difference rather seeking common ground. Was he the first to do this? Heck no. Did it help pull our nation apart? Certainly. Could Bush have been president any other way? Probably not.

  • The current generation of high schoolers and young adults give me hope. They realize they are inheriting our inaction on climate policy and are doing something themselves—and are able to navigate a very polarized political environment. These kids are alright!

  • The value of rote memorization crashed with the rise of search engines and ubiquitous computing. So too, have schools modeled after 20th-century factories. The new skills: critical thinking, adaptability, grit, and emotional intelligence

Want more conversations like this?

Join the Quartz community for all the intelligence, without the noise.

App Store BadgeGoogle Play Badge
Leaderboard Screenshot

A community of leaders, subject matter experts, and curious minds bringing nuance back to how we talk about the news.

Editors' Picks Screenshot

No content overload: our editors will curate the most notable and discussion-worthy pieces for you every day.

Share Screenshot

Don’t just read the story, tell it: contribute your ideas and experience to the dialogue.