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Samad Sadri

Samad Sadri

Research Assistant at Middle East Institute
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  • Yamamoto argues that both the Taliban and Afghan government want 1) an Islamic Government, 2) a country governed by a constitution, 3) and a country that is no longer a safe haven for terrorists nor a threat to its neighbor.

    What he neglects to mention is that the Taliban and the Afghan government have each their own interpretation of an Islamic country. Each have separate vision of what that government and a new constitution would look like. If both parties agreed on the interpretation of Islamic

    Yamamoto argues that both the Taliban and Afghan government want 1) an Islamic Government, 2) a country governed by a constitution, 3) and a country that is no longer a safe haven for terrorists nor a threat to its neighbor.

    What he neglects to mention is that the Taliban and the Afghan government have each their own interpretation of an Islamic country. Each have separate vision of what that government and a new constitution would look like. If both parties agreed on the interpretation of Islamic laws there wouldn’t be any conflict in the first place.

  • The Taliban argue they are fighting foreign occupation in Afghanistan and yet over 90% of those killed in since 2001 are Afghan citizens.

  • President Ghani announced a ceasefire against Taliban fighters until the end of the holy month of Ramadan (mid-June). However, Afghan Security Forces and Coalition Forces will continue their fight against ISIS-K and Al-Qaeda fighters. Hopefully this gesture will at least encourage some of the Taliban foot soldiers to consider possible pathways to a peace negotiation and reintegration into the civil society.

  • The Pashtun Tahafuz Movement (PTM) is a nonviolent group seeking equal rights for Pashtuns living across Pakistan and today one of their rallies in the city of Wanna became under attack by insurgents. The attack was blamed on a violent extremist group that first became active in 2006 by Maulvi Nazir. He was killed in a US drone strike in 2013. Members of Maulvi Nazir's group are predominantly Pashtuns and so are supporters and organizers of the PTM. One carries anti-state sentiments and stages violent

    The Pashtun Tahafuz Movement (PTM) is a nonviolent group seeking equal rights for Pashtuns living across Pakistan and today one of their rallies in the city of Wanna became under attack by insurgents. The attack was blamed on a violent extremist group that first became active in 2006 by Maulvi Nazir. He was killed in a US drone strike in 2013. Members of Maulvi Nazir's group are predominantly Pashtuns and so are supporters and organizers of the PTM. One carries anti-state sentiments and stages violent attacks, while the other pushes for changes in state behaviors through nonviolent strategies. It is too soon to make any kind of assumption behind the motives of today's attack.

  • Afghanistan in 2018 has come a long way from where it was in 2001. With the exception of recent surge in Taliban attacks, Afghans are now healthier, wealthier, and more educated. Today, Afghanistan has strong army, police force, and special forces commandos that are well trained. More Afghans are politically active and more women are included in the workforce. Proper financial and banking system, bilateral trade agreements with neighboring countries, regional connectivity, free media, and access

    Afghanistan in 2018 has come a long way from where it was in 2001. With the exception of recent surge in Taliban attacks, Afghans are now healthier, wealthier, and more educated. Today, Afghanistan has strong army, police force, and special forces commandos that are well trained. More Afghans are politically active and more women are included in the workforce. Proper financial and banking system, bilateral trade agreements with neighboring countries, regional connectivity, free media, and access to information and technology are just some of the achievements that we have witnessed in the country in the past 17 years.

  • Weapons seized from the Taliban fighters by Afghan Security Forces in Farah City are sophisticated assault rifles with advanced scopes that are made in Russia. Yes, the war will keep going as long as the Taliban are receiving advanced military gears and weapons and backing from external powers - be it Iran, Russia, or Pakistan.

  • Opening of Iran’s Chabahar Port was a major economic step for Afghanistan. It opened new trade routes for the landlocked country. Reinstating economic sanctions on Iran will severely impact Afghanistan’s trade with India and other countries in the Persian Gulf.

  • President Trump was right when he pointed to Iran’s destabilizing moves in the region, especially in Syria, Iraq, Yemen, and Lebanon. However, a US withdrawal from the JCPOA was not the best choice. It took 13 years for the US to reach a deal with Iran in order to prevent a future nuclear rival in the Middle East. Now a decision to reimpose economic sanctions on Iran will have global economic consequences. We are already seeing a hike in gas prices in the US and Canada.

  • “Human Rights Watch found that the Afghan government has developed almost no capacity to investigate civilian casualties arising from its military operations.”

    Last month, more than 60 people were killed during a religious ceremony in Northern Afghanistan. Majority of the victims were students. The airstrike was carried by Afghan Security Forces, aimed at killing a Taliban commander.

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