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Brett Forman

Brett Forman

Freelance Writer
  • Now that Bezos’ private texts were allegedly hacked, perhaps Amazon will want to stand for privacy.

    But to say that Amazon stands for nothing makes no sense: it stands for consumerism, materialism, and more.” By monetizing your browsing data, it commoditizes its users, and it’s a military-defense contractor

    Now that Bezos’ private texts were allegedly hacked, perhaps Amazon will want to stand for privacy.

    But to say that Amazon stands for nothing makes no sense: it stands for consumerism, materialism, and more.” By monetizing your browsing data, it commoditizes its users, and it’s a military-defense contractor and part of what Eisenhauer famously described as the “military industrial complex.” When he announced his private charter school, Bezos said children were our most important commodity. And when he says everyday at Amazon is “day 1,” he’s literally quoting Pol Pot and the teachings of the re-education camps of Cambodia, as seen in the film “The Killing Fields.” In a nutshell, Amazon stands for “more.” By contrast, Marie Kondo stands for less.

  • Great points, but what about the more than 50 percent of married couples who get divorced? And what about working poor parents whose two or three jobs don’t even cover childcare? There’s something classist about this take and perspective, and its audience seems to be directed at only one segment of the

    Great points, but what about the more than 50 percent of married couples who get divorced? And what about working poor parents whose two or three jobs don’t even cover childcare? There’s something classist about this take and perspective, and its audience seems to be directed at only one segment of the millennial population, and therefore, yet another case of millennial narcissism, because it’s blind to so many millions of working poor parents and divorced parents and their plight. On the other hand, it is a great way for millennials of all

    economic classes to fast-track their way to becoming grandparents. ... If you really want to avoid Millennial burnout, or burnout at any age, I suggest getting a flip phone and deleting your social media accounts. I do not see social media use as compatible with good, present, mindful parenting. After all, it’s been widely reported that most silicon valley parents don’t let their kids have smartphones or iPads because they’re too addictive. And these are the parents that designed these devices, technologies, and platforms. That’s why they know better.

  • I’m pretty sure that by this point, Amazon’s AI and predictive analytics knows when each of its customers will die: https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.foxnews.com/tech/google-ai-can-predict-when-youll-die-with-95-percent-accuracy-researchers-say.amp

    As a similar case in point, Facebook recently filed

    I’m pretty sure that by this point, Amazon’s AI and predictive analytics knows when each of its customers will die: https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.foxnews.com/tech/google-ai-can-predict-when-youll-die-with-95-percent-accuracy-researchers-say.amp

    As a similar case in point, Facebook recently filed a patent that predicts everywhere we will travel in the future: https://www.inc.com/betsy-mikel/facebook-just-filed-for-creepy-patent-this-might-be-reason-enough-to-delete-its-app.html.

    Is there AI that can predict if I’ll ever be happy? Or is that a paradoxical question?

  • When your main investor (SoftBank) shrinks its reported $20 billion investment in your “tech” start-up to only $2 billion after the Saudi’s Vision Fund (also part of Softbank) bailed on what many think is a glorified real estate deal, what do you do? Why, you change the name of the company to a wee one

    When your main investor (SoftBank) shrinks its reported $20 billion investment in your “tech” start-up to only $2 billion after the Saudi’s Vision Fund (also part of Softbank) bailed on what many think is a glorified real estate deal, what do you do? Why, you change the name of the company to a wee one, and you get the pro—corporate cheerleading press to gloss over the diminished investment and focus on the company’s positive aspects and its ambitions. According to CNN, the VisionFund is worth $93 billion and is largely funded by Saudi Arabia’s Sovereign Wealth Fund, more widely known as the Public Investment Fund (PIF). Among other investments, this fund owns 25 percent of Arm Holdings, the chipmaker that may replace Intel chips in Macs and is currently in all iPhones and iPads; SoftBank owns the other 75 percent of Arm Holdings. I think the real story here is that Saudi Arabia is still flooding tech companies with cash, and it prefers to invest in tech companies like Arm and not closed-system, work-living-education utopian microcities. I don’t know why WeWork or The We Company is valued so highly, but I do know the Saudis seem to be making a safer bet on things like Arm and Uber. I just hope that the part-owner of Apple’s main chip manufacturer stops killing journalists and violating human rights and avoids anti Semitic rhetoric. Apple should hope so too. By the looks things, it seems almost like SoftBank wanted to make its own version of China’s Foxconn out of a WeWork/Arm combo, where workers sleep, eat, defecate, and get their kids educated in a Walt Disney-esque closed system. Since every attempt at creating a utopia has historically produced a dystopian outcome, it looks like the Saudi’s made the right call. Let’s hope they make the right call on human rights, too.

  • Never reading most of your emails but saving all of them forever creates an amazing searchable database of your life. This may be the only time that hoarding and procrastinating pay off.

  • Yes, but how do both stack up against RR (Real Reality)? By which I mean, are there any limits to how long one can spend in a VR simulated world before there are health risks, and how long can one wear AR devices uninterrupted before there are health risks? Also, do they accept reality checks?

  • There goes my business plan for “SheWork,” the female-only work space I was developing in the skunksworks of my mind. ... Question: If the guy suing this club, which is known as “Wing,” gets admitted, does that make him its Wingman? ... while no one should be sexually harassed, ever, anywhere, regardless

    There goes my business plan for “SheWork,” the female-only work space I was developing in the skunksworks of my mind. ... Question: If the guy suing this club, which is known as “Wing,” gets admitted, does that make him its Wingman? ... while no one should be sexually harassed, ever, anywhere, regardless of gender, for any reason, I don’t think discrimination, exclusion, or any form of lesser-of-two-evils-ism is the best solution to this problem. Unless restraining orders or orders of protection are involved. Then it’s OK.

  • Um, we need laws to regulate (prevent) congressmen, judges, and regulators from investing in the tech companies they’re supposed to regulate or even consider regulating. Otherwise, we’re nothing more than “government by the corporate personhood segment of its population, for the corporate personhood

    Um, we need laws to regulate (prevent) congressmen, judges, and regulators from investing in the tech companies they’re supposed to regulate or even consider regulating. Otherwise, we’re nothing more than “government by the corporate personhood segment of its population, for the corporate personhood segment of its population.” If we’re gonna be so stupid that we accept or believe that corporations have the same rights as people, then at the very least, give the people the same rights as corporations, for starters, and tax people at the lower corporate rate. I mean, we’re giving discounts to “corporate persons” even though they’ll never be drafted into the army or forced to go to school. If we value and want to reward greed, however, and moving profits on income taxed at a lower rate than the rate most working Americans pay, then please disregard this.

  • Am I missing something? America does this to non-citizens daily and has been doing this to its citizens of color for centuries. The list is nonsense — Antarctica isn’t even a country, and what developed nation doesn’t arbitrarily enforce its local laws, especially its antiquated ones still on the books

    Am I missing something? America does this to non-citizens daily and has been doing this to its citizens of color for centuries. The list is nonsense — Antarctica isn’t even a country, and what developed nation doesn’t arbitrarily enforce its local laws, especially its antiquated ones still on the books? Isn’t this also called “prosecutorial discretion?” Look, I’m not tone-deaf. I get it. China’s totalitarian impulses are growing as are its international espionage efforts and human rights abuses. That’s a serious issue that should have been properly addressed long ago. But putting China on a list of countries that do what every other developed nation does daily isn’t the way to do it. I’m not sure if this is even newsworthy, if you think about it. I’m no defender of China or any country that violates human rights, but I don’t think putting China on a list that includes the UK, France and Denmark is newsworthy.

  • Have we cured cancer, diabetes, and the conditions that cause predictable intergenerational poverty—to name but a few of our late-stage civilization’s innumerable mortal enemies? What’s that, you say? Not yet? ... Then why are we creating robots to deliver empty calories to able-bodied college students

    Have we cured cancer, diabetes, and the conditions that cause predictable intergenerational poverty—to name but a few of our late-stage civilization’s innumerable mortal enemies? What’s that, you say? Not yet? ... Then why are we creating robots to deliver empty calories to able-bodied college students when they could use the exercise necessary to haul themselves to the vending machines at the end of the hall? And what could these students be doing, other than studying robot repair, that’s so important, they need a robot to fetch them Doritos instead of taking a snack break? As I’ve been saying, AI will take our coffee, cigarette, and snack breaks long before it takes our jobs. ... And let me say this: capitalism has lost its freakin’ mind. How do I know? Easy: Its greatest minds are creating solutions to problems that don’t exist, at the expense of finding solutions to very real and dire ones, to enrich a few at the expense of everyone else, all within in the same economy. On the plus side, I don’t think you have to tip a robot or worry about it coughing, sneezing, or spitting on your food, and it’s great at remembering the day’s specials.