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Erik Chittick

Erik Chittick

  • It's great that it's been growing in the States. I do think it's been happening long enough and has gotten enough of a foothold here that everybody should hereby understand that, yes, Americans call it soccer and we don't need to explain this in every comment or post anymore. Everyone knows. Everyone

    It's great that it's been growing in the States. I do think it's been happening long enough and has gotten enough of a foothold here that everybody should hereby understand that, yes, Americans call it soccer and we don't need to explain this in every comment or post anymore. Everyone knows. Everyone also knows that some people think that's dumb and will steer any conversation about "football" toward some genius observation they've made along the lines of how, in American Football, the feet aren't even used except for running, so why would we call it football? Some variation of this will pop up too often, and I suppose there might be some utility in revisiting this old tar if you're drunk and can't think of any way to fill an awkward silence. Just know that EVERYBODY KNOWS it's called soccer here and that, yeah, it's a funny thing how words stuck or didn't stick. While it's proper to allow this as a brief curiosity and to forgive it of drunken companions, there should be no encouragement of it. Don't engage with this topic because, no, it's not fascinating anymore and to act as if it were would be to enable its continued use. Just nod without smiling and move forward into talks of players or stats or the weather. He/she will get the point and be duly corrected.

    In addition, all editors everywhere should mark submissions heavily where writers veer into this territory as a curious, human interest hook. It's not interesting, nor should it provoke curiosity in anyone beyond a quick Google search. It's time for the old bat to retire.

    While on Google, though, there are really interesting theories about why it's taken so long to catch on in the States when it's so wildly popular everywhere else. Your drunken friend could maybe be steered to speculation on this matter. Is it related to a capitalist, hierarchical or organizational mindset that exists in a mix unique to the US? Do the rules have correlates to the ways we organize our ethical landscape, or approach how we idealize merit as a guiding principle? Is it about nationalism and how it is experienced differently in the US? Many will say it has taken long to catch on simply because it's "boring". That's a valid opinion, but why would it be boring to Americans while obviously not being so to folks living elsewhere? And how does Renaldo fit into this discussion? Because he does, you'll see.

  • I am a bit puzzled that this has taken so long. They seem ideally suited for this. Having mined our data, listened to our calls, tracked our habits, watched us have sex... J/k (or am I?)... having compiled all this into a composite understanding of who we are that's more accurate than even our own view

    I am a bit puzzled that this has taken so long. They seem ideally suited for this. Having mined our data, listened to our calls, tracked our habits, watched us have sex... J/k (or am I?)... having compiled all this into a composite understanding of who we are that's more accurate than even our own view, they should be able to hook us up using big data pattern prediction that will seem frankly miraculous, compared to our own feeble data processing algorithms, hobbled as they are by cognitive biases and distortions, emotional static and neuroses.

    For fun, I'd recommend an episode in the 2nd season of black mirror. Can't recall which. Actually, they all apply.