Skip to navigationSkip to content
Ethan P.

Ethan P.

Student
  • As members of the human race, we desperately need to take a deep and intensive look at the ethics of CRISPR research. Ethicists have been arguing the issue for decades; it’s time to make some decisions—if tentative ones—before it’s too late. Clearly, regardless of the taboo or even government regulation

    As members of the human race, we desperately need to take a deep and intensive look at the ethics of CRISPR research. Ethicists have been arguing the issue for decades; it’s time to make some decisions—if tentative ones—before it’s too late. Clearly, regardless of the taboo or even government regulation, scientists are going to start conducting CRISPR-related experiments and research involving humans. It is imperative that we immediately lay down basic laws that prevent any sort of truly terrible things from being done. If we want to effectively regulate this new, risky wing of science, we have to take some preventative steps before it gets into full swing—if it’s not too late already.

  • America’s infrastructure is largely built to accommodate cars. This means that having a vehicle is often the only way to travel with any sort of efficiency, depending on where you live.

    A significant decrease in the amount of people owning and driving cars would bring about an interesting series of

    America’s infrastructure is largely built to accommodate cars. This means that having a vehicle is often the only way to travel with any sort of efficiency, depending on where you live.

    A significant decrease in the amount of people owning and driving cars would bring about an interesting series of problems for city planners to solve, as well as many benefits. Seeing as the need to commute will never go away, less private vehicles would perhaps bring back public transportation to the forefront of how people move from place to place—not forgetting Uber and Lyft, of course. Less cars on the road would also mean less carbon discharge, improving air quality. Roads take up a huge amount of space, as well; reduction in traffic may lead to reduction in road-size, allowing for more dense development in cities and also less budgetary consideration for smaller cities who wish to expand.

    The main problems would probably be wasted space because of unused roads, parking garages, and other vehicle-related paraphernalia that we’ve accumulated due to our overuse of the car in our daily lives; a need to increase the capacity of public transport; a necessary optimization of sidewalks, bike lanes, and other pedestrian accommodations.

    It’s certainly an interesting theory and one that I’m extremely interested to watch come to fruition if it does.

  • The pressure on Purdue relating to Oxycontin is obviously having an effect on the upper level brass and the Sacklers themselves.

    To me, the firing of that many sales staff seems to be either an attempt to show that they are “addressing the problem” and stave off some of the bad press or simply just

    The pressure on Purdue relating to Oxycontin is obviously having an effect on the upper level brass and the Sacklers themselves.

    To me, the firing of that many sales staff seems to be either an attempt to show that they are “addressing the problem” and stave off some of the bad press or simply just a panicked decision by people under a great deal of scrutiny...or perhaps both.