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Philip Eyrich

Philip Eyrich

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  • What if the orbits of each planet are also not perfectly circular? I believe were are on more of an elliptical path.

  • Consider the media source, The NYT. The Senator should not refer anonymously since it is equally important that the FBI, etc be able to evaluate the source. I’m tired of hearing anonymous sources speak through others; to me, that’s as good as gossip, and that’s not reliable.

    I’m not surprised at the slowness of the confirmation because there are millions of pages of documents to go through, unlike with prior confirmations.

  • I was surprised that Estonia was mentioned but neglected. I’d like to see more about their system because Estonia is a highly advanced country in regard to education and inventions. I believe they still have the world’s fastest internet speed, for one, and they’ve managed to have people assimilate to their culture, preserving it.

    One teacher in the USA had problems with refugees in her classroom. The kids came from places in Asia where hatred, fighting, and war was common between the two nations

    I was surprised that Estonia was mentioned but neglected. I’d like to see more about their system because Estonia is a highly advanced country in regard to education and inventions. I believe they still have the world’s fastest internet speed, for one, and they’ve managed to have people assimilate to their culture, preserving it.

    One teacher in the USA had problems with refugees in her classroom. The kids came from places in Asia where hatred, fighting, and war was common between the two nations (in this case). The solution turned out to be very simple. The teacher took aside the kids who were fighting and explained she knew their history was antagonistic, but, she pointed out, they are no longer citizens of those countries so the animosity need not continue. She added, you are here to start a new life in a new place, so let’s let go of the past and focus on your new identity as citizens of the USA. It worked.

    It is interesting that each country implements different things regarding education. How many are repeating the things others have tried and found unsuccessful? How many implement the things found to work well?

    If communication and identity are two of the basic foundations, we all need a common language for public use and know our identity as belonging to and sharing the country’s laws and culture. I find that it is growing more difficult to communicate with others who have come to the USA and in better cases have learned some amount of English to survive well, but not really thrive. We should not need to figure out what the other means - at least not taking up so much time that it slows everything down. It’s much easier to thrive in a country or culture if you fully adopt their ways and use the common language. Even though the USA is unique in the world, being a mixture of people from Europe in its early days, and even having more people immigrate over time. Most of them knew it would be best to adopt the new culture and speak the common language - English. We are now a fractured nation with groups of people forming their own society within the greater overall society, an identity where each adheres mostly to their ancestors culture and language. It makes thing more inefficient and slow to say the least. If one moves to Japan, China, Korea, Estonia, Saudi Arabia, Iran, Venezuela or Bolivia, we would have to adopt their common language, their culture, laws, ways, etc or we likely would survive; I doubt they’d cater and change for us, even though they are kind people.

  • Proposition 13 from back in the 70’s made it so a number of people would not lose their homes simply because their property taxes went up. That’s a great deal for those who are low income such as many seniors and retirees. If you really want to see a mass exit from CA, get rid of Prop 13. Even with Prop 13, many cannot continue living in CA. CA’s becoming a place for the wealthier. Prop 13 has a huge problem though - it locks lower income people into the home they have, so they cannot easily move

    Proposition 13 from back in the 70’s made it so a number of people would not lose their homes simply because their property taxes went up. That’s a great deal for those who are low income such as many seniors and retirees. If you really want to see a mass exit from CA, get rid of Prop 13. Even with Prop 13, many cannot continue living in CA. CA’s becoming a place for the wealthier. Prop 13 has a huge problem though - it locks lower income people into the home they have, so they cannot easily move except perhaps out of state. They can’t just up and move when their neighborhood becomes bad either.

    https://www.hjta.org/propositions/proposition-13/what-do-you-tell-new-neighbor-about-proposition-13/

  • She knows she crossed the line when she spoke about Trump previously, and that’s not good judicial behavior. She will need to recuse herself from any case involving Trump because her bias is clearly known now.

    "You can't set term limits, because to do that you'd have to amend the Constitution," Ginsburg said. "Article 3 says ... we hold our offices during good behavior."

    "And most judges are very well behaved," she added, to laughter.

    I think she knows she didn’t behave well, and so she laughs about it.

  • The wall actually benefits Mexico as well. They’ve been wanting to reduce the number of guns crossing the border and this will certainly help. Their farmers have been wanting the drug lords out, and by blocking the drugs from passing into the USA via a complete wall, farmers and others should see drug lords leave for other places since the Mexican people apparently are not drug customers. I’m sure there are other benefits to Mexico. It may also stop people from wanting to cross through Mexico, a country which grants asylum and such.

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