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Oliver  Staley

Oliver Staley

Deputy editor at Quartz
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  • An absolutely fascinating story I had the privilege to edit. What's most intriguing is the idea that future lives matter as much as current lives, and maybe more so because ,in theory ,most people who will exist have yet to be born. Taken to its logical extreme, it forces philanthropists to ignore the suffering of today to prevent immeasurably more suffering tomorrow (or in a thousand years).

    But it also rests on lots of assumptions, like that there will be a tomorrow, and that other solutions to

    An absolutely fascinating story I had the privilege to edit. What's most intriguing is the idea that future lives matter as much as current lives, and maybe more so because ,in theory ,most people who will exist have yet to be born. Taken to its logical extreme, it forces philanthropists to ignore the suffering of today to prevent immeasurably more suffering tomorrow (or in a thousand years).

    But it also rests on lots of assumptions, like that there will be a tomorrow, and that other solutions to the problems of the future won't present themselves later. That suggests that there perhaps should be a form of discount rate for the future, where present-day problems deserve more of our attention, because the future is so opaque.

  • A horrifying story, not just because it exposes the capricious cruelty of US immigration policy, but because it demonstrates the desperation of parents who embark on such a foolhardy attempt to gain asylum without appreciating the risks.

  • Identifying trafficked children requires intensive AI-driven detective work, but in many cases finding the children is that's the easy part. The statistics show extricating them from their situations and delivering them to safety appears to be much harder.

  • Noa Pothoven’s story is incredibly distressing because it feels so unnecessary. We can never feel the pain she feels, but it is so hard to believe there is nothing out there-no therapy, no drug, no system of belief-that can’t offer her some peace. Euthanasia, if it must exist, should be a last resort. For a 17 year old with so many abundant talents, it feels like a tragic first resort.

  • We bought our home with a Nest installed and while I appreciate the modest convenience (change the thermostat while lying in bed!) it’s dependence on connectivity is a nagging worry. It is a microcosm of our new app-enabled lives: it all works swimmingly until it doesn’t.

  • While former NBA player God Shammgod is probably the top choice for the all-time, all-name team, I have always been partial to basketball playing brothers Majestic and Scientific Mapp.

  • Boston-area gamblers have been flocking to the Foxwoods and Mohegan Sun casinos for decades. The question isn't whether Wynn will appeal to Boston-area gamblers (if it has slots, they will come), it's whether there's enough gamblers for all the inventory. I would anticipate heavy discounting on rooms and shows at the older properties to keep old customers loyal.

  • Harris’s plan is well intentioned but misguided, because it focuses on equalizing pay for “analogous work.” Study after study has shown that men and women are paid roughly the same for doing the same job; the wage gap persists because too few women are doing the same job as men. The gap exists because there are far more men in senior positions making far more money than women, who drop out of the workforce or are passed over for promotion. Harris would be smarter to push for board quotas for women

    Harris’s plan is well intentioned but misguided, because it focuses on equalizing pay for “analogous work.” Study after study has shown that men and women are paid roughly the same for doing the same job; the wage gap persists because too few women are doing the same job as men. The gap exists because there are far more men in senior positions making far more money than women, who drop out of the workforce or are passed over for promotion. Harris would be smarter to push for board quotas for women; with more senior women setting corporate policy there is a greater chance women will advance in companies.

  • Congestion pricing will work in New York because-despite its flaws- it has the most extensive public transportation system in the nation. Most US cities don’t come close, and their commuters have no option but to drive. According to the Times, 130 million Americans drive to work, while only 8 million take public transportation. Until there are widely available transportation options, congestion pricing is just a regressive tax for most commuters.

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