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Eileen Workman

Eileen Workman

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  • Eileen Workman
    Eileen Workmancommented on this story

    I have found that the use of all forms of the verb “to be” (is, was, are, will be) as declarative statements when opining tend to create more fixed perspectives within myself. They also tend to trigger hostile reactivity in those who hold different perspectives.

    As I get better at avoiding declarative statements I find it easier to avoid taking a fixed position in relationship to a given idea. I can then lay the idea “on the table” alongside the ideas of others and compare, contrast, ask questions

    I have found that the use of all forms of the verb “to be” (is, was, are, will be) as declarative statements when opining tend to create more fixed perspectives within myself. They also tend to trigger hostile reactivity in those who hold different perspectives.

    As I get better at avoiding declarative statements I find it easier to avoid taking a fixed position in relationship to a given idea. I can then lay the idea “on the table” alongside the ideas of others and compare, contrast, ask questions, pick them apart, detangle them and entwine them in many different ways to see what results. This process seems to work better when it comes to generating inspired insights than did my old process of taking a fixed position and then challenging others to try and move me off it.

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