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Rachel Ouellette

Rachel Ouellette

Doctoral student

I am currently a PhD student in a clinical psychology program for children and adolescents.

  • Perhaps the most concerning thing here is the prioritization of political beliefs over mental health. The fact that this is a story about the alt-right at all is troublesome. It’s concerning that alt-right supporters are using a cry for help as fuel for their own theories, but it’s also concerning that

    Perhaps the most concerning thing here is the prioritization of political beliefs over mental health. The fact that this is a story about the alt-right at all is troublesome. It’s concerning that alt-right supporters are using a cry for help as fuel for their own theories, but it’s also concerning that most other people are pointing fingers at the behavior of the alt-right theorists rather than the fact that this man has been releasing concerning videos since February asking for help and doesn’t appear to have gotten the help he needed. Yes, this is a very politically salient time, but if all focus goes towards what the “right” vs “left” sides are doing, then those identities will continue to be how we judge others, rather than making judgments based off of values like supporting those in need, no matter an individual’s political leanings.

  • Use of jargon has the immediate effect of creating an “in-group” “out-group” effect, where only those who understand the jargon are let in on the conversation. When peer reviewing articles, sometimes the fear of becoming part of the “out-group” can prevent reviewers from admitting and acknowledging when

    Use of jargon has the immediate effect of creating an “in-group” “out-group” effect, where only those who understand the jargon are let in on the conversation. When peer reviewing articles, sometimes the fear of becoming part of the “out-group” can prevent reviewers from admitting and acknowledging when something doesn’t make sense, primarily out of fear that it simply doesn’t make sense to them rather than actually being nonsensical. For me, the use of jargon is troublesome primarily because it creates a divide between academia and public readers. If research is to maximally benefit the public, it has to be consumable by the public. Therefore, academic peer reviewers need to become braver in calling out excessive use of jargon, because if they can’t understand it, then the rest of the world most likely won’t either. It is in this gray space that people begin to apply their own interpretations to research findings, applying research in potentially inaccurate and dangerous ways.