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Isabelle Barriball

Isabelle Barriball

  • 'Self-made' they say. Most of Kylie Jenner's wealth did not come from her own work.

  • As one who has struggled with an eating disorder for much of her life, I must say how truly damaging diet, or what is now called 'wellness', culture is to society. We preach to people that their weight and their physical health are the most important things about them. We preach this to people not for

    As one who has struggled with an eating disorder for much of her life, I must say how truly damaging diet, or what is now called 'wellness', culture is to society. We preach to people that their weight and their physical health are the most important things about them. We preach this to people not for the sake of their own health or happiness, but for the sake of making a profit. No one in these industries cares about the physical or mental well being of their clients. All they care about is making money. And how do they make money? Like this... First, the make us feel bad about our bodies. Tell us that to exist in a larger body is shameful or unhealthy. They tell us that, in order to be worthy of love and happiness, we must be an acceptable size and shape. Then, they sell us diets and programs which 1) follow rigid eating and exercise regimes that cam actually be dangerous to our health long term and 2) have been scientifically proven to not work. Lastly, they blame us for the fact that the diet failed. And guess how they solve that problem? By selling us another diet. Framing diets as 'wellness' is just another way of manipulating the public into feeling badly about themselves and spending unnecessary money on products that simply do not work.

  • As someone who has struggled with an eating disorder for several years now, I find these kind of programs triggering and somewhat offensive. Although healthy behaviors is something to be encouraged, what counts as healthy varies greatly from person to person. BMI has been proven as an inaccurate way

    As someone who has struggled with an eating disorder for several years now, I find these kind of programs triggering and somewhat offensive. Although healthy behaviors is something to be encouraged, what counts as healthy varies greatly from person to person. BMI has been proven as an inaccurate way of measuring someone's health. This also promotes the idea that weight is an indicator of health, and that weight loss is always a positive thing. From the perspective of someone who has routinely starved herself, abused exercise, and been entirely consumed and obsessed with food on a daily basis as a means of 'getting in shape' and 'being healthy,' I believe these health incentives do far more damage to an individual's mental wellbeing than they do good for their overall health, and that's not to mention the perpetuation of diet culture...

  • I don't believe it's radical to allow younger people to run, given the fact that our current president does meet the age requirement but is still not equipped to run the country. Clearly age isn't the issue...