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Ephrat Livni

Ephrat Livni

Senior Reporter at Quartz
  • US Navy captain Brett Crozier was fired for breaking protocol by widely disseminating a memo about infection spreading onboard his vessel. Marine Corps veteran and military law expert Gary Solis told me he suspects Crozier will end up an "assistant Coke machine officer in Port Hueneme." In other words, he's screwed.

  • There are much bigger problems plaguing us than the postponement of US Supreme Court hearings. But delaying oral argument means important cases impacting the 2020 presidential elections could remain pending indefinitely.

    Activists want the justices to hold the debates telephonically or via videoconference

    There are much bigger problems plaguing us than the postponement of US Supreme Court hearings. But delaying oral argument means important cases impacting the 2020 presidential elections could remain pending indefinitely.

    Activists want the justices to hold the debates telephonically or via videoconference. Appellate advocates are torn about their importance. And this reporter considers argument days the highlight of DC life.

    Still, one arguably good thing about the coronavirus crisis is that it's forcing the court to consider technological options it has long resisted.

  • Before you breathe a sigh of relief because the US government cares about its people, consider the nine million student loan borrowers whose payments aren't suspended under the CARES Act, with interest is accruing daily as the economy collapses.

  • Sure, it feels like the whole world has changed in mere weeks. But there's one issue in the US that the people reliably can't agree upon—access to abortion—and the language of the pro-choice movement is now being used to prove this is an elective, therefore non-essential, procedure.

  • A pending US Supreme Court case that seemed supremely important last year is much more so in light of the current coronavirus pandemic. American healthcare educators predicted that it would be critical to public health to keep all healthcare workers in the US due to shortages. especially in the case

    A pending US Supreme Court case that seemed supremely important last year is much more so in light of the current coronavirus pandemic. American healthcare educators predicted that it would be critical to public health to keep all healthcare workers in the US due to shortages. especially in the case of a national emergency like this. They specifically discussed the likelihood of a pandemic.

    The Trump administration wants to rescind their work authorizations and send these workers "home" to countries they don't know. The justices seemed skeptical of the government's position last year, asking whether the administration really considered all the reliance interests, the many industries and businesses that would be affected by the expulsion of 700,000 US-educated employees. Now, that question is undeniably extremely relevant, as more than 27,000 of them work in health and medicine and many more qualify as essential workers in this time of crisis.

  • With a pandemic throwing the world into chaos it's impossible to continue with politics as usual. That has worked out especially well for Israeli prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu, who has been indicted on corruption charges and is now enlisting his political rival to assist him in passing special legislation

    With a pandemic throwing the world into chaos it's impossible to continue with politics as usual. That has worked out especially well for Israeli prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu, who has been indicted on corruption charges and is now enlisting his political rival to assist him in passing special legislation tailored to his allegedly crooked circumstances. And we may well see similar upheavals around the globe.

  • It's difficult to imagine how a country like Senegal (where I served in the Peace Corps) will contain the virus given the extremely limited access to healthcare in many villages and for the indigent in major cities like Dakar. Even people from the most remote communities, 10 miles from a paved road

    It's difficult to imagine how a country like Senegal (where I served in the Peace Corps) will contain the virus given the extremely limited access to healthcare in many villages and for the indigent in major cities like Dakar. Even people from the most remote communities, 10 miles from a paved road, say, travel to local and city markets and can bring disease back to their families who have zero chance of getting tested or treated and who will eat meals together from communal bowls, living close in tiny huts. But at least some African governments are responding promptly to the crisis while the coronavirus caseload is relatively low (119 cases in Senegal, according to this story).

    The US is a mess right now and it's hard not to feel desperate about the fact that the wealthiest nation in the world can't manage the pandemic on the most basic levels (masks, ventilators, tests, etc). It's never been more clear that American talk of national superiority is a lot of hot air—or "wind talk" as they say in Wolof, just "waxan galau."

  • As a reporter, I of course cannot deny the usefulness of news. But when it comes to the coronavirus crisis and the onslaught of stories that only show how little we know, a philosophical approach helps me find balance. So my worn and torn copy of the Tao Te Ching now sits on my desk all day as I reluctantly

    As a reporter, I of course cannot deny the usefulness of news. But when it comes to the coronavirus crisis and the onslaught of stories that only show how little we know, a philosophical approach helps me find balance. So my worn and torn copy of the Tao Te Ching now sits on my desk all day as I reluctantly contend with abrupt and frustrating changes.

    This brief and illuminating text transcends time and culture and has been read for millennia by people around the world because it addresses the challenges we all must face, most notably the yin-yang of fortune and misfortune.

  • Imagine if you had no internet access and had to deal with these wild times offline. While some internet service providers are stepping up in the face of coronavirus and relaxing their rules to ensure that more people without service can get it now, their charitable actions only show that such an essential

    Imagine if you had no internet access and had to deal with these wild times offline. While some internet service providers are stepping up in the face of coronavirus and relaxing their rules to ensure that more people without service can get it now, their charitable actions only show that such an essential service should be a public utility.

  • It seems that a $2 trillion coronavirus stimulus package will soon pass the Senate. Passage was halted this weekend as Democrats fought for clauses that ensure the $500 billion slated for industry doesn't (unwittingly?) end up lining the pockets of the rich. This morning minority leader Charles Schumer

    It seems that a $2 trillion coronavirus stimulus package will soon pass the Senate. Passage was halted this weekend as Democrats fought for clauses that ensure the $500 billion slated for industry doesn't (unwittingly?) end up lining the pockets of the rich. This morning minority leader Charles Schumer told his colleagues that certain clauses will ensure the president and other elected and appointed officials don't cash in on this massive package.