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Cassie  Werber

Cassie Werber

Reporter at Quartz
  • Part of me was surprised to learn the extent to which consumer behaviour is NOT yet pushing brands and companies to change. But part of me wasn't surprised, because I as a consumer find making ethical really hard. It's often totally unclear how to make a better choice between two similar products, or

    Part of me was surprised to learn the extent to which consumer behaviour is NOT yet pushing brands and companies to change. But part of me wasn't surprised, because I as a consumer find making ethical really hard. It's often totally unclear how to make a better choice between two similar products, or how to choose one type of consumption over another (say online over going to a physical shop). I think a lot of people would love to consume more mindfully but the information and tools to help them do so aren't there yet. It will be powerful when that information becomes truly accessible, and when people start using it both to make decisions and to connect with others.

  • To me, this was one of the most interesting tangents the B Corp story is taking. We have an industry—private equity—with a longstanding reputation for not dealing particularly ethically with, for example, the companies it buys or their workers. Just two private equity firms have recently certified as

    To me, this was one of the most interesting tangents the B Corp story is taking. We have an industry—private equity—with a longstanding reputation for not dealing particularly ethically with, for example, the companies it buys or their workers. Just two private equity firms have recently certified as B Corps, which means plending to work for the good of stakeholders, not just make money. So is the industry changing? Or are the PE firms certifying as B corps outliers? Or is this the shape of things to come? If anyone has more thoughts I'd be very interested to hear them.

  • This story came out of looking at data: What was the global distribution of "B Corps"—a designation for purpose-driven companies. Finding a few "onlys" piqued my interest, so I looked more into them. What could have motivated a big new company in Afghanistan, which had so much complexity to deal with

    This story came out of looking at data: What was the global distribution of "B Corps"—a designation for purpose-driven companies. Finding a few "onlys" piqued my interest, so I looked more into them. What could have motivated a big new company in Afghanistan, which had so much complexity to deal with already, to also go through the B Corp certification process?

    What I discovered was an extraordinary story, including some incredible community work, a massive business, and recent tragedy.

  • To me, the most interesting thing about a massive company transforming this way is that it change has to come from the top and the bottom simultanously. And, as one interviewee put it, from the sides in.

  • I love the nuance of this debate, and this piece. But to bring an international (well, English) perspective, no one speaking British English (or British-accented English) ever uses y'all—at least in my hearing. It's not part of the dialect. We do use 'you guys' a lot, and I'm inclined to side with those

    I love the nuance of this debate, and this piece. But to bring an international (well, English) perspective, no one speaking British English (or British-accented English) ever uses y'all—at least in my hearing. It's not part of the dialect. We do use 'you guys' a lot, and I'm inclined to side with those who think usage is changing the meaning. In the UK, 'guy' is rarely used in the singular, but very often in the plural: you guys, hi guys, etc. As a feminist, I don't have a problem with it because I think it's become a dialect word meaning 'people.' Having said that, I'd also support a whole new neutral alternative, like they have in Sweden!

  • If I'm on my own, I try to lie down during phone meetings, because lying on the floor can be really helpful for back pain — especially compared to constant sitting in an office chair. My problem with phone booths isn't just the air, it's the rigidity of the space. Fine for a 5 minute private call, but

    If I'm on my own, I try to lie down during phone meetings, because lying on the floor can be really helpful for back pain — especially compared to constant sitting in an office chair. My problem with phone booths isn't just the air, it's the rigidity of the space. Fine for a 5 minute private call, but bad for longer calls where we could be using the time to be kind to our bodies.

  • I also found this particularly fascinating because Japan has such a reputation for tough, long hours. Interestingly, in Ireland where several trades unions and other bodies are pushing for more uptake of four-day weeks, the focus is on the public sector: The government is a massive employer. The other

    I also found this particularly fascinating because Japan has such a reputation for tough, long hours. Interestingly, in Ireland where several trades unions and other bodies are pushing for more uptake of four-day weeks, the focus is on the public sector: The government is a massive employer. The other country seriously looking into the four day week, which surprised me? Russia. Medvedev seems to be taking seriously the idea that a compressed work week could make Russians happier, and help tackle unemployment.

  • We're so used to hearing the word "Brexit" that it's hard to remember the term was barely ever used before 2016.

  • I keep thinking about the insights from this book, especially the idea that there are three "transitions" in the lives of couples where making sure two careers stay on track is particularly hard. Having come through one of them (and seen others struggle with it) I'm now applying the idea to lots of situations

    I keep thinking about the insights from this book, especially the idea that there are three "transitions" in the lives of couples where making sure two careers stay on track is particularly hard. Having come through one of them (and seen others struggle with it) I'm now applying the idea to lots of situations, and it's illuminating.

  • There's a lot of talk about wellbeing at work right now, and this is a useful bit of evidence for the debate: Happy workers found to be 13% more productive.