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Nadav Avidan

Nadav Avidan

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  • I would suggest that it’s not just price that’s influencing this decision (for most households, anyways), but mainly the relevancy of content. Simply put, people are willing to pay premium to gain access to high quality shows (for example, HBO), while no one would pay for generic, considered-to-be-low quality content.

    And if the game is content relevancy, then the winners of this evolution will be the ones that are able to cater to many, and not to niche audiences only. Paying 15 dollars and having

    I would suggest that it’s not just price that’s influencing this decision (for most households, anyways), but mainly the relevancy of content. Simply put, people are willing to pay premium to gain access to high quality shows (for example, HBO), while no one would pay for generic, considered-to-be-low quality content.

    And if the game is content relevancy, then the winners of this evolution will be the ones that are able to cater to many, and not to niche audiences only. Paying 15 dollars and having something to watch for every member of the household is the real deal. That’s why Disney needed Fox and Hulu, I guess.

    Yes, it will cost us more, probably. But you know what? The upside is that we’ll get to see amazing content being produced for us- And that is great news, to me.

  • Business, as life, is not about always winning or always losing. It’s about giving it a go, getting after it, realizing what works and what doesn’t and learning from it. Sounds like Amazon has been doing just that.

  • My first (and so far, only) question on Quora has been “why does branding suffer from such poor branding?”.

    This is a wonderful article, well written and a step towards answering my question- don’t think you can overlook branding just because you’re pissed at your former branding agency :-)

    There’s a balance between branding and performance marketing, a dichotomy, if you will. To leave a real and lasting impact, you have to utilize both.

  • Another proof that if money is involved, people will find a way to engage in fraudulent activities. Should we mark this as “human nature” and move on? Or should we try to find a way to better ourselves? Is it even possible to change who we are?

  • That is probably the biggest problem FB is facing these days. Their reputation suffered (and still suffers) so many blows and hits lately, that nothing feels simple and fun with the social network anymore. How to change that? First step- stop acting like it’s not true.

  • Another way to look at it: if you’re connected from home, it might raise questions as to how sick you really are... A wise manager once told me, “if you’re sick, stay home and get well. If not, get here because we need you”.

    If you think an occasional sick day will make the whole company stop and say “wait, do we really need them around?”, then my only advice would be to acknowledge that first, you’re not the center of the universe, and second, if you provide real value when you’re not sick (let’s

    Another way to look at it: if you’re connected from home, it might raise questions as to how sick you really are... A wise manager once told me, “if you’re sick, stay home and get well. If not, get here because we need you”.

    If you think an occasional sick day will make the whole company stop and say “wait, do we really need them around?”, then my only advice would be to acknowledge that first, you’re not the center of the universe, and second, if you provide real value when you’re not sick (let’s assume it’s the majority of days in a given year, shall we?), you’re not going to be judged by the days that you are sick.

  • So Snapchat became Snap, Dunkin’ Donuts became Dunkin’, Weight Watchers became Watchers, and now WeWork became We?

    Changing your name as part of a rebrand is one hell of a decision to make. And yes, if the new brand architecture requires you to do it, you should consider. But these half baked changes are super hard to implement, as it keeps the old brand name pretty much alive and kicking in our memory...

    I hope this change will be felt in more than just creative copy and a lovely poster in the

    So Snapchat became Snap, Dunkin’ Donuts became Dunkin’, Weight Watchers became Watchers, and now WeWork became We?

    Changing your name as part of a rebrand is one hell of a decision to make. And yes, if the new brand architecture requires you to do it, you should consider. But these half baked changes are super hard to implement, as it keeps the old brand name pretty much alive and kicking in our memory...

    I hope this change will be felt in more than just creative copy and a lovely poster in the kitchen. If it’s done to create a clearer legal entity, I would have recommended the Alphabet approach (a legal name that no one uses other than lawyers, probably), and not the Snapchat- sorry, Snap- one...

    What would you recommend?

  • Similar sites can be seen around your local gym. My two cents: if you want to change something in your life, change it. All a resolution needs to become a reality is for you to commit to it and see it through. If you cling on to an external date as your fuel, it’s going to get harder and harder as that date moves away from you and disappears in the pages of days that were.

  • Even with all that, the main problem with analyzing data and targeting based on the results is still very much alive and kicking:

    We may have the “what”, we haven’t created a single form of tech to help us with the “why”. Not yet, anyways. Am I choosing a violent narrative on the show because I’m violent? Or because a friend at work told me to give it a try and be amazed? Am I liking someone’s post about a vegan restaurant because I am vegan myself, or because I have a crush on them and want them

    Even with all that, the main problem with analyzing data and targeting based on the results is still very much alive and kicking:

    We may have the “what”, we haven’t created a single form of tech to help us with the “why”. Not yet, anyways. Am I choosing a violent narrative on the show because I’m violent? Or because a friend at work told me to give it a try and be amazed? Am I liking someone’s post about a vegan restaurant because I am vegan myself, or because I have a crush on them and want them to notice me? Am I searching for a vacation because I want to go, or because I had a bet with a friend that it won’t cost less than $5k?

    With all these predictions of a sad future, we’re still no way near a solution to this question, it seems. The “why” remains hidden. And until we solve the riddle of how to insert word-of-mouth into the equation, I’m not falling for these targeted dystopian nightmares.

    Don’t believe me? Look at the average Click Through Rate we consider successful, review how much these companies already know about us, and then, let’s talk...

  • My guess is that most of these articles entered this list because people were looking for these topics on Google, and the Wiki links come in first.

    So if anything, it goes to show that maybe people aren’t using Wikipedia to gain in depth knowledge on evergreen topics, but rather simply fulfill a short term need to know something quick. Leaves me wonder if and how that can/should change. What do you think?

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