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Garrett Donnelly

Garrett Donnelly

Assistant Manager & Sales Representative at Vector Marketing
  • The fact that I was at first urged to endorse this decision is proof of how completely incapable our governments are in enforcing the truth and discouraging false or hate speech. Then I remembered, “wait, yeah, Facebook is a business. They make money on vagueness, not taking a side over types of users.

    The fact that I was at first urged to endorse this decision is proof of how completely incapable our governments are in enforcing the truth and discouraging false or hate speech. Then I remembered, “wait, yeah, Facebook is a business. They make money on vagueness, not taking a side over types of users.” They’re not inclined to block hate speech, and their record shows it. They invoke classical liberal arguments about the “free market of ideas,” in fact, to defend hate speech regardless of their general leftist bent. But they have SOME type of moderation, which ousts the most extreme and indefensible language. And the fact that this little compensation swayed me is... sad. The truth is, this looked like a good idea to me at first because our governments’ limits to free speech are even more lax. There are conservative arguments that heavily censor obscenity and nudity, things we consider adult and classical liberal allowances, offensive but unharmful topics, but seem to endorse hate speech, something that can never be considered a liberty because of its direct intention of harm and not mere offense.

  • I feel like commentary on how bizarre and mortifying Trump’s presidential behavior is is just superfluous at this point. We all know he’s overstepping every day and destroying democracy in favor of authoritarianism. Anyone who disagrees with him is fired.

    We need to talk about why this is happening

    I feel like commentary on how bizarre and mortifying Trump’s presidential behavior is is just superfluous at this point. We all know he’s overstepping every day and destroying democracy in favor of authoritarianism. Anyone who disagrees with him is fired.

    We need to talk about why this is happening. Presidential popularity and a trend of presidential overreach, including the instantiation of the scope of the executive bureaucracy, have tricked Trump and much of the public into believing the role of the president is the CEO of the US. Let’s make this clear: the role of the executive should be inferior to the power of the legislative body. They are mere diplomats, spokespersons for the nation and heads of state. Executors of the laws, subject to the laws (that they’re not allowed to create). Right now, this constitutional order of affairs is not the case. This is terrifying.

  • I think a more realistic symptom than imminent doom that people usually imagine is that we won’t be able to treat AI well in our current society. If AI really is sentient, and makes claims on dignity, rights, liberties, and autonomy usually classed to humans, we are not prepared to accommodate and treat

    I think a more realistic symptom than imminent doom that people usually imagine is that we won’t be able to treat AI well in our current society. If AI really is sentient, and makes claims on dignity, rights, liberties, and autonomy usually classed to humans, we are not prepared to accommodate and treat justly. I know this because we can’t even treat people well where there are no debates about their sentience.

  • Circular approval networks were always bound to become antisocial, decrease dialogue, and radicalize both the left and right. I call myself liberal, but I am cognizant of the fact that even I am unwilling to engage the more ridiculous radicals - and that’s how they get so far away from regular social

    Circular approval networks were always bound to become antisocial, decrease dialogue, and radicalize both the left and right. I call myself liberal, but I am cognizant of the fact that even I am unwilling to engage the more ridiculous radicals - and that’s how they get so far away from regular social behavior, on both sides of the line.

  • Those that resent his fiscal policy, I invite you to consider what a free market should mean, what equal opportunity should mean, and whether the GDP of a country says anything about the citizens worst off in that society - we’re not talking numerical amounts: you can’t say “the U.S.’s poverty stricken

    Those that resent his fiscal policy, I invite you to consider what a free market should mean, what equal opportunity should mean, and whether the GDP of a country says anything about the citizens worst off in that society - we’re not talking numerical amounts: you can’t say “the U.S.’s poverty stricken are much better off than those in poverty abroad,” because what defines poverty is the level of restriction from normal society one faces. The mass incarceration system (1% incarcerated, but 25% of prisoners in the world) the gender wage gap, and the poverty rates in america (14%) are embarrassing for the “richest and most free country in the world.” Now consider, that we DO try to right the wrongs of those numbers, those lives, so that opportunity IS equal, the market IS free, and all of our citizens are if not prosperous, at least not suffering. The outcry of these programs is the PRICE, price price. But what one who resents these fiscal policies doesn’t understand is that we can never divorce social and fiscal policy. It costs money to take care of people; and when we realize people have long chosen pockets over people, from slavery to corporation, we realize there is only one way - the ‘radical’ progressive way.