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Josh  Simpson

Josh Simpson

Social Commentator/Podcast Host/Manager

I’m the assistant general manager for a craft brewing company. I’m a blogger and podcast host. I discuss and write on a variety of topics from politics to philosophy.

Blog: www.theonlyone.cf

Podcast: necessarybs.buzzsprout.com

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  • The book “Coddling of the American Mind” covers this very issue. There is a strong correlation between the birth of social media and the rise of depression and anxiety (on average) in children. Social media moves the driving motivational force in people to that of superficiality. People become addicted to attention and it causes us to focus on what we don’t have, as a pose to what we do have. My fear with social media is how feeling validation holds more weight than fact or truth. We join groups

    The book “Coddling of the American Mind” covers this very issue. There is a strong correlation between the birth of social media and the rise of depression and anxiety (on average) in children. Social media moves the driving motivational force in people to that of superficiality. People become addicted to attention and it causes us to focus on what we don’t have, as a pose to what we do have. My fear with social media is how feeling validation holds more weight than fact or truth. We join groups with people whom are like minded and their algorithms creates echo chambers where reasoning and understand has been replaced with anger and hatred. Essentially social media has created a virtual high school lunch room on a global scale.

  • Change is inevitable throughout generations because generations simply scale with time (especially in the work force). Industrial capitalism plays a large role by simply investing capital in machines and technology to increase production of marketable goods, which in turn lowers the jobs in particular markets. Agriculture is a prime example with roughly 86% of the work force being in agricultural in the 1500’s, but by the 1850’s it dropped down to 25%. In our current day and age automation is continuing

    Change is inevitable throughout generations because generations simply scale with time (especially in the work force). Industrial capitalism plays a large role by simply investing capital in machines and technology to increase production of marketable goods, which in turn lowers the jobs in particular markets. Agriculture is a prime example with roughly 86% of the work force being in agricultural in the 1500’s, but by the 1850’s it dropped down to 25%. In our current day and age automation is continuing to take over a lot of jobs and common American jobs at that (retail, factory, food industry, etc.), which has, and will continue to change the dynamic of the workforce. The increasing college tuition costs also play a factor with the price tag of a degree often times not equating to the average income within the job market of the degree. Lastly, the stagnation of wages compared to the current cost of living. As in the buying power of the consumer hasn’t changed since 1978. A personal example is even at my wage of around $17/hr and judging from the guidelines of spending no more than 30% of my income on housing, I would need a place for roughly $845 a month which the average one bedroom apartment in my city is $1,000 a month. As a millennial myself, I believe what is happening is my generation isn’t buying the “American Dream” pitch anymore because opportunity (although of course still always here) has been increasingly more difficult to navigate than in the past with the growing tie of monopolies within markets and we just aren’t having it anymore which leads to use holding the ranks of being entitled or snowflakes when in actuality we simply are working towards shaping a new American Dream involving more personal fulfillment without the large consequences of time sacrifice for work as generations have done in the past.

  • I think a lot of the socialism hype comes from the rhetoric on the right critiquing the left. Conservatives often use absurdism to make ideas they don’t agree with seem unjust. My view of democratic socialism isn’t the “dismantling” of capitalism (as I’ve heard multiple arguments saying it is), but more of a capitalist reform. Capitalism has its benefits, but it’s an easy system to manipulate and now more than ever we’re seeing increasing examples of how the system has been taken advantage of. The

    I think a lot of the socialism hype comes from the rhetoric on the right critiquing the left. Conservatives often use absurdism to make ideas they don’t agree with seem unjust. My view of democratic socialism isn’t the “dismantling” of capitalism (as I’ve heard multiple arguments saying it is), but more of a capitalist reform. Capitalism has its benefits, but it’s an easy system to manipulate and now more than ever we’re seeing increasing examples of how the system has been taken advantage of. The ideas of equal opportunity and fairness in competition are great in theory, but never really factors in human nature or the context of the competition. In capitalism profit is the only measurement of success, which leads to extreme greed, which then leads to value of profit over the wellbeing of the worker and/or consumer. Capitalism provides massive advantages to those with money and those with capital use the tools of hard work and determination to undermine the lack of success for others. This is fine and dandy, because there is some merit to that, but those values aren’t realistic for everyone. Several factors come into play when evaluating opportunity. Society will always have inequality because societies need mediocrity. Societies wouldn’t function if we were all lawyers, doctors or successful entrepreneurs. As a humanist, I see Democratic socialism as an idea to try and create more of a balance between capital and the worker.

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