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Jeff Chau

Jeff Chau

Founder/CEO at gamegether, inc

Jeff is the Founder/CEO of GameGether, a social+ e-commerce app tailored for gaming communities. Jeff has wide experience in the gaming industry, leadership experience at Apple, and commerce background. He's been GM Apple; GM/Head of Mobile Immortals; Team Liquid; Analyst Commentator for the 18th Asia Games Jakarta-Palembang, Tencent Games, Supercell, Red Bull Esports, Super League Gaming, and Super Evil Megacorp; and has experience as a former Professional Player, Head Coach, Esports org Founder/Owner, Twitch Partnered Streamer, and Tournament & League Owner/Administrator.

World Cyber Games (WCG) Xi'an 2019 Speaker. The Future of Mobile Gaming & Esports panel moderator @ IGEC (Inven Global Esports Conference). Gaming panel speaker at GamesBeat, PAX West, and XLive Esports Summit.

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  • 62% of Chinese gamers are strongly drawn to esports compared to ~18% of US gamers (17%-19% of US gamers regularly watch Esports weekly). In Greater SEA, about 60% of gamers are strongly drawn to esports.

    Asian gamer culture plays a role but mobile gaming has been core to that explosive growth. In China, hardcore mobile gamers play 40 hrs/wk on average vs hardcore PC gamers playing 30 hrs/wk on average—so based on this hardcore mobile gamers are more hardcore from an hourly standpoint vs hardcore

    62% of Chinese gamers are strongly drawn to esports compared to ~18% of US gamers (17%-19% of US gamers regularly watch Esports weekly). In Greater SEA, about 60% of gamers are strongly drawn to esports.

    Asian gamer culture plays a role but mobile gaming has been core to that explosive growth. In China, hardcore mobile gamers play 40 hrs/wk on average vs hardcore PC gamers playing 30 hrs/wk on average—so based on this hardcore mobile gamers are more hardcore from an hourly standpoint vs hardcore PC gamers when it comes to gaming. 30%+ of Chinese Esports fans are female vs only 17% in the US. If you isolate mobile esports, it's 50%+ of mobile esports fans are female in China.

    I am speaking at the World Cyber Games (WCG) Xi'an, China 2019 tomorrow (July 18) on this topic of East vs West. And will be posting my entire 30+ slide presentation along with talking points on my Medium later this week—it has very good insights, data-points, and images to help many understand esports better (especially the tech and social insights and trends).

    So anything Esports in Asia is a strong bet and will continue to grow. If you look at Huya (Esports focused streaming company), they recently announced profits doubled.

  • Saw this trend developing multiple years ago, especially in China. Technology along with tech savvy generations have enabled social e-commerce for new and used products. Example, I love using LetGo app, it's local, quick, convenient and way better and easier than selling on Ebay.

  • This is great news, we should welcome robots and it replacing non-creative jobs such as warehouse fulfillment. We still have a long way to go for self-driving and especially self driving tractor trailers (which is insanely hard for AI to learn how to drive, we're many many years away).

    It's not about "where do these jobs go" because look at history with the invention of electricity, people probably said "where do all the candle jobs and candle lighting jobs" go?

    We'll have more and more creative

    This is great news, we should welcome robots and it replacing non-creative jobs such as warehouse fulfillment. We still have a long way to go for self-driving and especially self driving tractor trailers (which is insanely hard for AI to learn how to drive, we're many many years away).

    It's not about "where do these jobs go" because look at history with the invention of electricity, people probably said "where do all the candle jobs and candle lighting jobs" go?

    We'll have more and more creative jobs, jobs AI cannot do. YouTube Creators, Twitch Streamers, Instagram Influencers, to TikTok Creators are just examples of new digital economy jobs. So please, let's stop focusing on the fear and focus on the growth, potential and abundance and improved quality of living robots bring us.

    I'm a perfect example, I commentated VIDEO GAMES for a living—something no one could have ever thought would be a professional career decades ago. So decades from now, what are those new, exciting and creative jobs?!

  • Very interesting, want to see how it does in NYC. Competition is always good but in order to beat Meetup, they have to be significantly better for users to switch. That's the challenge with social networks, Snap has immense value and offered something different and arguably 10x+ better than what existed on Facebook or Instagram or WhatsApp for high schoolers, that's why they took off.

  • Bold claim: "He said that he knows some millennial employees who have said that they will not work at a company if it’s not already using or planning to adopt 15Five, and since talent is the cornerstone to a company’s success this could have a significant impact."

    Looking forward to checking out their product as startups can use something economical and easy to use/implement.

    Frequent feedback is important, not only for development but, more importantly, shows you care about your employees. That's

    Bold claim: "He said that he knows some millennial employees who have said that they will not work at a company if it’s not already using or planning to adopt 15Five, and since talent is the cornerstone to a company’s success this could have a significant impact."

    Looking forward to checking out their product as startups can use something economical and easy to use/implement.

    Frequent feedback is important, not only for development but, more importantly, shows you care about your employees. That's why I did mandatory weekly 1-on-1's with my management team, it makes such a big difference in their performance, morale, and—most critical—personal and professional relationship to me and the company.

    People and relationships they have with you and the company are so critical, without a strong foundation there to support talent development, setting goals, having open/honest communication, etc., execution will suffer.

  • Great article, wisdom is important. It does seem like investors like to bet on young founders due to their perceived energy and maybe because they have "fresh" eyes towards a problem vs an older person who has lived the problem for many years. But if you look at recent successful IPOs like Zoom, Eric Yuan, the founder and CEO was around 42 when he started Zoom (he worked at WebEx/Cisco for many many years and built up the specific knowledge, insights, network, etc to successful start and run Zoom)

    Great article, wisdom is important. It does seem like investors like to bet on young founders due to their perceived energy and maybe because they have "fresh" eyes towards a problem vs an older person who has lived the problem for many years. But if you look at recent successful IPOs like Zoom, Eric Yuan, the founder and CEO was around 42 when he started Zoom (he worked at WebEx/Cisco for many many years and built up the specific knowledge, insights, network, etc to successful start and run Zoom).

    Interesting tidbit, I believe Zoom is one of Sequoia's few profitable companies in 2019 in terms of generating profits + IPO and they invested at Series D stage.

  • Might work, when I ran Targets as GM, I helped do their Pfresh remodels, where they added fresh groceries, installed refrigerators, and freezers. It increased traffic and lead to more store visits and sales due vs just having general merchandise and clothes like Kohl’s.

    In Asia and parts of LA, the Asia grocery markets have actually good restaurants inside them right next to cash registers and they are very popular and driving lots of traffic.

    I mean many of my affluent friends in LA, some literally

    Might work, when I ran Targets as GM, I helped do their Pfresh remodels, where they added fresh groceries, installed refrigerators, and freezers. It increased traffic and lead to more store visits and sales due vs just having general merchandise and clothes like Kohl’s.

    In Asia and parts of LA, the Asia grocery markets have actually good restaurants inside them right next to cash registers and they are very popular and driving lots of traffic.

    I mean many of my affluent friends in LA, some literally drive to get their lunch and dinner at Whole Foods. It’s really about quality here.

    If you are a general merchandise store with great cosmetics department and add groceries like Target, I don’t see why the reverse won’t work. Especially because the demographics of Whole Foods shoppers are higher income, affluent women shoppers.

  • Esports is the future of sports with how it is captivating entire generations of young kids.

    Baseball and traditional sports need to learn from esports which is very player and viewer focused experiences and products. Few ads, lots of trailers, hype video/content, team to play introductions, funny videos, personality, then top it off with music concert like dynamics and technology *gasps*. That's the future of entertainment and traditional sports like baseball not only *don't* get that, it's boring

    Esports is the future of sports with how it is captivating entire generations of young kids.

    Baseball and traditional sports need to learn from esports which is very player and viewer focused experiences and products. Few ads, lots of trailers, hype video/content, team to play introductions, funny videos, personality, then top it off with music concert like dynamics and technology *gasps*. That's the future of entertainment and traditional sports like baseball not only *don't* get that, it's boring and so...traditional the programming, etc. Where is the hype?

    But don't get me wrong here, Esports needs to learn from traditional sports on how to monetize and build sustainable business models--but wherever the millions of eyeballs go, monetization normally comes after.

    Both esports and sports can learn from each other.

    The last baseball game I went to, a lot of it was getting the audience to participate and get excited...the hype wasn't coming as much from the players, etc. In esports players are interviewed post matches and usually hype things up (some of the smack talking is hilarious and some players just fall flat too which is also awkward and funny to witness), then you have commentators talking to an online audience and their voices are broadcasted to the entire live audience in the stage/arena—which is very different compared to live sports. We watch multiple teams battle it out instead of just 2 teams facing each other...we get to see 8 teams or so in one day. You can hear the energy and excitement, this is why comparing esports vs sports, a lot of the live audience aren't on their phones as much as you see at baseball games.

    Update the programming (Why so long and so many damn commercials? How long do you think that is going to last? You want to keep doing the same thing every season and year as viewership keeps declining?), stop creating stuff for advertisers, think about the fan and player experience and journey. And get some hype w/ technology otherwise you'll never win the younger generations by staying the same instead of adapting to a digital world, the young generation, interactive entertainment, hype content, etc.

  • Not surprised. US is so wasteful it’s sad and disappointing. I lived in Germany for 2 years and they had much stricter rules on recycling and trash collection. You have to sort your trash. And after being in Singapore multiple times and learning about how they deal with trash on such a small land mass, they have invested significantly in treatment and burn facilities where they incinerate their trash to generate electricity and somehow, through filters and technology, the smoke that comes out of

    Not surprised. US is so wasteful it’s sad and disappointing. I lived in Germany for 2 years and they had much stricter rules on recycling and trash collection. You have to sort your trash. And after being in Singapore multiple times and learning about how they deal with trash on such a small land mass, they have invested significantly in treatment and burn facilities where they incinerate their trash to generate electricity and somehow, through filters and technology, the smoke that comes out of those plant chimneys are cleaner than the air around it.

    Singapore is a great lesson for the rest of the world to invest in trash technology (pun intended) because it ain’t trash. Plastics are still a challenge of course but it’s amazing to see what Singapore has accomplished, so much of the world can learn from one another to help fight back for Mother Earth because she’s been fighting for us the entire time (watch One Strange Planet and you’ll weep for planet Earth, we are so lucky to be here because of 🌎 ).

  • Finally, these small things do change the user experience and actually helps ppl feel more connected with each other. Great stuff from Apple, they still have so much work to catch up from an AI/ML standpoint vs Google. Glad Tim Cook's adding of a SVP of Machine Learning and AI Strategy is paying off.

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