Skip to navigationSkip to content
Rodrigo Davies

Rodrigo Davies

pro
Team Lead, Metro at Strava

Rodrigo is a technologist who is passionate about modernizing government and building products. He leads Strava's Metro group, which empowers planners around the world with data to make active transport accessible, safe and efficient for everyone. He has served as a consultant to the Mayoral offices of San Francisco and Boston and the UNDP, and co-founded Build Up, an award-winning non-profit organization developing new methods for resolving conflict. Rodrigo began his career as a journalist at Bloomberg, the BBC and Conde Nast, but while at Conde Nast found his calling as a product manager, helping to launch the company's digital business in India. He is a graduate of Oxford University and MIT.

  • This reminds me of the story that Quincy Jones would always have small, low quality monitor speakers in the studio to playback recordings (e.g. when making Thriller) because he wanted to make music that would sound good on any speaker. Though I love QJ's work, of course, imho it’s net positive for music

    This reminds me of the story that Quincy Jones would always have small, low quality monitor speakers in the studio to playback recordings (e.g. when making Thriller) because he wanted to make music that would sound good on any speaker. Though I love QJ's work, of course, imho it’s net positive for music that the hardware people use is improving on average. It broadens what creators can do and be valued for.

  • What's challenging about this decision is that the reasoning and decision making process is fairly opaque. The outcome is a binary "yes/no" and we have little insight into what opportunities and conditions Uber was given to resolve these issues and how responsive/unresponsive it was. As more providers

    What's challenging about this decision is that the reasoning and decision making process is fairly opaque. The outcome is a binary "yes/no" and we have little insight into what opportunities and conditions Uber was given to resolve these issues and how responsive/unresponsive it was. As more providers come to London, these types of issues are going to arise more often. The city should look to develop a transparent process that makes clear to drivers, riders and the rest of the public that operators are being given due process to resolve issues and highlights where operators are not cooperating. That would reduce misunderstanding around decisions and reduce the uncertainty that this decision creates. Press releases aren't the right way to litigate these issues in public.