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Jayati Ghosh

Jayati Ghosh

pro
Development economist

Jayati Ghosh is a development economist. Ghosh is currently a professor of economics at Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi and Executive Secretary of International Development Economics Associates (www.networkideas.org). The author and/or editor of a dozen books and around 200 scholarly articles, she has advised governments, consulted for international organisations including ILO, UNDP, UNCTAD, UN-DESA, UNRISD and UN Women and is a member of several international commissions.

  • Please DO NOT SEE THIS AS A CLASH BETWEEN TWO GROUPS OF STUDENTS - its was a targeted and planned attack with the complicity of the JNU administration and some faculty members who were helping to organise the goons brought in from outside, with the open complicity of JNU security and the Delhi Police

    Please DO NOT SEE THIS AS A CLASH BETWEEN TWO GROUPS OF STUDENTS - its was a targeted and planned attack with the complicity of the JNU administration and some faculty members who were helping to organise the goons brought in from outside, with the open complicity of JNU security and the Delhi Police. I personally saw them preparing openly inside the campus an hour before the attack. The violence has been terrible and several of our students and colleagues are badly injured. Lots of damage to property.hey first pelted stones at a peaceful gathering of students and teachers, then charged at them and beat viciously. They entered hostels and tried to force open rooms, including women's rooms, destroyed windows and furniture and whatever they could find, identified left and Muslim students and beat them viciously. They chased women students and faculty members and beat them up. All this while, the security guards and the police stood and watched. The president of the students union was brutally attacked, she was bleeding profusely from a head injury, but the mob, guards and police at the gate would not allow the ambulance to leave the campus even when she personally pleaded with them. She finally was taken out of another gate with other injured students an hour later.

    After the goons were allowed to wreak havoc for nearly three hours, they were escorted safely out of campus by the police, there are videos of that and of some of the terror inside.

    This is state-sponsored terror on an educational institution of repute, a week after the Home Minister's speech calling for the "anti-nationals" behind the public protests to be taught a lesson. S expecting any justice or accountability for this attack is unrealistic. The people of India have to decide if this is what we want for our present and future - and those who can exercise some restraint from going down this terrible path have to speak up forcefully now. Any equivocation at this point is complicity - and will provide only very limited and doubtful personal gains. Yesterday Jamia and Aligarh, today JNU - tomorrow they will come for anyone.

  • This is not as big a deal as it may appear – it is really just Google accepting something that was going to happen anyway, because Ireland would no longer offer the company that particular tax avoidance strategy from 2020 (that is, this year). The company will continue to use its transfer pricing methods

    This is not as big a deal as it may appear – it is really just Google accepting something that was going to happen anyway, because Ireland would no longer offer the company that particular tax avoidance strategy from 2020 (that is, this year). The company will continue to use its transfer pricing methods (including charging for intellectual property rights and other intangibles whose origin is hard to establish) to pay the least possible taxes by shifting its profits across various tax jurisdictions. The only way to stop this is an idea that has been mooted by ICRICT and is being discussed at the OECD/G20 Inclusive Framework on BEPS (base erosion and profit shifting).

    The idea is this: since an MNC actually functions as one entity, it should be treated that way for tax purposes. So the total global profits of a multinational should be calculated, and then apportioned across countries according to some formula based on sales, employment and users (for digital companies). This is something that is actually already used in the United States where state governments have the power to set direct and indirect tax rates.

    Obviously, a minimum corporate tax should be internationally agreed upon for this to prevent companies shifting to low tax jurisdictions. (ICRICT has suggested 25 per cent.) Then, each country can simply impose taxes on the MNCs operating in their jurisdictions, in terms of their own shares based on the formula.

    Since this idea is now being seriously considered, MNCs are trying to subvert the process in various ways: by arguing that only “residual profits” rather than “routine profits” (whatever those are!) should be so distributed across countries, or by claiming that they are going to be good and pay their taxes in important countries. It’s important not to get distracted by these moves – getting MNCs to pay their fair share of taxes (that is, the same that domestic companies pay) would be a win-win situation for governments and citizens across the world.