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THE BEST COMMUTE

Slowly but surely, working at home is becoming more common

A woman working on a computer at home.
Reuters/Marco Bello
A nice place to work.
  • Dan Kopf
By Dan Kopf

Data editor

This article is more than 2 years old.

The steady rise of Americans working from home continues. According to recently released data from the US Census, 5.2% of workers in the US worked at home in 2017—or 8 million people. That share is up from 5% in 2016, and 3.3% in 2000.

The rise has been aided by improved internet connectivity and the demand for more flexible work environments. A 2017 report by polling company Gallup found that work-from-home options helps companies retain their employees (paywall). Given that the evidence suggests working from home may also improve employee productivity, it’s a perk with few drawbacks.

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