TOO OBVIOUS

This photo of Donald Trump at NATO is a little too on the nose

BRUSSELS, BELGIUM – JULY 11:  (From L to R, first row) German Chancellor Angela Merkel, Belgian Prime Minister Charles Michel, NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg, U.S. President Donald Trump and British Prime Minister Theresa May attend the opening ceremony at the 2018 NATO Summit at NATO headquarters on July 11, 2018 in Brussels, Belgium. Leaders from NATO member and partner states are meeting for a two-day summit, which is being overshadowed by strong demands by U.S. President Trump for most NATO member countries to spend more on defense.  (Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images)
BRUSSELS, BELGIUM – JULY 11: (From L to R, first row) German Chancellor Angela Merkel, Belgian Prime Minister Charles Michel, NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg, U.S. President Donald Trump and British Prime Minister Theresa May attend the opening ceremony at the 2018 NATO Summit at NATO headquarters on July 11, 2018 in Brussels, Belgium. Leaders from NATO member and partner states are meeting for a two-day summit, which is being overshadowed by strong demands by U.S. President Trump for most NATO member countries to spend more on defense. (Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images)
Image: Sean Gallup/Getty Images
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At today’s NATO summit in Brussels, the west’s gathered leaders turned their head in unison to watch a military flyover. But for a brief moment, US president Donald Trump’s attention drifted elsewhere.

Leaders from NATO member and partner states view a military flyover.
Leaders from NATO member and partner states view a military flyover.
Image: Sean Gallup/Getty Images

The resulting photo is an almost too perfect symbol for the tenor of the meeting. Ahead of his arrival, Trump had attacked the other members of the 29-nation North Atlantic Treaty Organization for contributing too little to the group’s common defense. At the meeting, he described Germany as a “captive of Russia.”

Ultimately however, the group resolved differences enough to sign new plans for defense against Russia and terrorism. The agreement includes a commitment from European leaders to boost spending.